Policy Directory

Catholic Education Diocese of Wollongong's updated policies contain Glossary Terms that are indicated in blue throughout the text.

Below is the full glossary of terms defined in our policies.

All policies and support documents can be found in the A-Z Dropdown below or at the Policy Directory.

 

TermExplanation
Aboriginal allied health or community services are services targeted for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to support their health, wellbeing and care. They are provided to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have the essential requirements to improve their quality of life and to provide preventative and proactive support services. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander is a person who is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent, and identifies himself or herself as an Aboriginal person or Torres Strait, and is accepted as such by the Indigenous community in which he or she lives. (This definition rejects the purely racial classification of the past and includes contemporary social and cultural factors. The term ‘Aboriginal people’ is more appropriate than ‘Aborigines’; ‘part-Aboriginal’ or half-caste’ are offensive terms and ‘Aboriginal’ should always be spelt with a capital ‘A’. (BOS, NSW, 2008, Working with Aboriginal Communities: A Guide to Community Consultation, Revised Edition)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander days of significance are a number of days throughout the year that have particular significance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and that should be appropriately acknowledged and recognised in schools in order to support reconciliation. These include Survival Day ( 26 January); National Apology Day (13 February); Harmony Day (21 March); National Close the Gap Day (20 March); National Sorry Day (26 May); National Reconciliation Week (27 May – 3 June); Mabo Day (3 June); Coming of the Light Day (1 July); National NAIDOC week (4 July – 11 July); National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (4 August): and International Day of the world’s Indigenous People (9 August) (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education serves two distinct purposes. Firstly it is to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are able to see themselves, their identities and their cultures reflected in the curriculum of each of the learning areas, and can fully participate in the curriculum and build their self-esteem. Secondly, it is to ensure that all students can understand Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures in order to engage in reconciliation, respect and recognition of the world’s oldest continuous living cultures. (ACARA, located at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/crosscurriculumpriorities)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities are significant people who directly influence the education outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Families include the parents/carers and extended family members of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Communities refer to the Aboriginal peoples who are the owners and custodians of the local Aboriginal lands, knowledge, histories and cultures. Aboriginal communities may also include Torres Strait Islander people who now live on the traditional lands of Aboriginal peoples across the Diocese. Developing awareness of the protocols of consultation and engagement with Aboriginal communities is a sign of respect and enables teachers to become aware of the diverse local community views and sensitivities. (BOS, NSW, 2008, Working with Aboriginal Communities: A Guide to Community Consultation, Revised Edition)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures provides opportunities for all students to deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the world’s oldest continuous living cultures and to understand that contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are strong, resilient, rich and diverse. It includes the underlying elements of Identity and Living Communities and key concepts of Country/Place, Culture and People. (ACARA, located at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/crosscurriculumpriorities)
Aboriginal Community Engagement Officers (ACEOs) are staff employed on a regional basis by Catholic Education, Diocese of Wollongong to support schools in their engagement with Aboriginal communities or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. They help to provide collaborative professional relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, elders, communities and service providers in order to improve the educational outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Aboriginal Education Assistants (AEAs) are support staff employed by Catholic Education, Diocese of Wollongong and appointed to schools in order to improve the educational outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. Depending on the context of the schools needs of the students, their key responsibilities include: supporting the educational outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students; supporting the development of cultural knowledge for all student a: and supporting effective partnerships with Aboriginal communities (CEDoW, 2017, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Aboriginal Education Consultative Group (AECG) is a community-based organisation that is a peak Aboriginal body in regard to Aboriginal education issues in NSW. It can provide advice and guidance for educators about the delivery of curriculum. (BOS, NSW, 2008, Working with Aboriginal Communities: A Guide to Community Consultation, Revised Edition)
Aboriginal spirituality as at the core of Aboriginal being, their very identity. It gives meaning to all aspects of life including relationships with one another and the environment. All objects are living and share the same soul and spirit as Aboriginals. There is a kinship with the environment. Aboriginal spirituality can be expressed visually, musically and ceremonially (Grant, 1996, 6-8, Gospel and Culture: An Aboriginal perspective, in Pattel-Gray A. (ed), Martung Upah: Black and white Australians Seeking Partnership, Harper Collins, Publishers, Melbourne)
accessioning is the process of adding a record for any new learning resource to the collection as they are received into the designated library area via the Library Management System. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
accreditation means that a Teacher has met the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers at one of the career stages of Graduate, Proficient Teacher, Highly Accomplished Teacher and Leader Teacher. (NESA, 2017, Guidelines for the Regulation of Teacher Accreditation Authorities for Non-government Schools and Early Childhood Education Centres).
Acknowledgement of Country is one of two ways to recognise the Aboriginal people as traditional custodians of the land as an important part of showing respect for the Aboriginal peoples of mainland Australia, acknowledging the Aboriginal Elders, and the ongoing relationships between the traditional custodians and the spiritual and cultural practices of the local area. It should occur when traditional custodians are not available and is a significant and symbolic reconciliation gesture. (CEDoW, 2017, Strategic Planning and Policy)
allocation of time is the recommendation of the Board of Studies for the time that should be spent on teaching each of the K-6 key learning areas. It includes English 25-35%, Mathematics 20%, Science and Technology 6-10%, Personal Development Health and Physical Education (PDHPE) 6-10%, Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) 6-10%, Creative Arts 6-10%, Additional activities up to 20%. As a guide 6-10% is approximately 1.5-2.5 hours in a typical teaching week. The additional activities might include scripture, school sport or debating, or expand the time on other curriculum areas. Teacher have flexibility o use these in accordance with school and system policies. In relation to Religious Education the allocation of time is 10% for Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 and 12% for Stage 2 and Stage 3 (NESA, 2017, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au and CEDoW, 2016, Catholic Life, Education and Mission Services).
annotated work samples are samples of students’ work that have written commentaries to assist teachers to have a clear understanding of the syllabus standards. The annotations should describe aspects of student performance and make reference to the assessment criteria of the activity. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Answer Guide is a document used in VET assessment to ensure that all VET assessors have the same expectations in relation to answers/evidence in order to maintain fair, consistent judgement across all Delivery Sites in the RTO. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
assessment is the process of identifying, gathering and interpreting information about student achievement. Assessment can be used for a number of key purposes, including to: assist student learning; evaluate and improve teaching and learning programs; provide information on student learning and progress in a course in relation to the syllabus outcomes; provide evidence of satisfactory completion of syllabus requirements and report on the achievement by each student at the end of a semester or year. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
assessment (VET) is the process of collecting evidence and making judgements in VET on whether competency has been achieved, in order to confirm that an individual can perform to the standard required in the workplace, as specified in a training package or VET accredited course. (Australian Government, Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015, p7)
assessment as learning occurs when students are their own assessors. Students monitor their own learning, ask questions and use a range of strategies to decide what they know and can do, and how to use assessment for new learning. Assessment as learning: encourages students to take responsibility for their own learning; requires students to ask questions about their learning; involves teachers and students creating learning goals to encourage growth and development; provides ways for students to use formal and informal feedback and self-assessment to help them understand the next steps in learning; and encourages peer assessment, self-assessment and reflection. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Assessment Certification Examination (ACE) Website provides current, easily accessible information for principals, teachers, parents and students about the rules and procedures set by BOSTES for secondary education in NSW. (BOSTES, NSW, located at www.ace.bostes.nsw.edu.au)
assessment criteria is used to support judgements about students’ knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the selected syllabus outcomes. Indicators in the syllabus can assist teachers in developing criteria for assessment and should indicate the level of performance that the student will be able to achieve at the end of the phase of learning. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
assessment for learning involves teachers using evidence about students knowledge, understanding and skills to inform their teaching. Sometimes referred to as ‘formative assessment' it usually occurs throughout the teaching and learning process to clarify student learning and understanding. Assessment for learning: reflects a view of learning in which assessment helps students learn better, rather than just achieve a better mark; involves formal and informal assessment activities as part of learning to inform the planning of future learning; includes clear goals for the learning activity; provides effective feedback that motivates the learner and can lead to improvement; reflects a belief that all students can improve; encourages self-assessment and peer assessment as part of the regular classroom routines; involves teachers, students and parents reflecting on evidence; and is inclusive of all learners. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
assessment of learning assists teachers in using evidence of student learning to assess achievement against outcomes and standards. Sometimes referred to as ‘summative assessment', it usually occurs at defined key points during a unit of work or at the end of a unit, term or semester, and may be used to rank or grade students. The effectiveness of assessment of learning for grading or ranking depends on the validity and reliability of activities. Its effectiveness as an opportunity for learning depends on the nature and quality of the feedback. Assessment of learning: is used to plan future learning goals and pathways for students; provides evidence of achievement to the wider community, including parents, educators, the students themselves and outside groups; and provides a transparent interpretation across all audiences. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
assessment plan is a documented plan of assessment experiences that indicates how students’ performance in each KLA/course is assessed, monitored and recorded. It is a registration requirement as part of the evidence of compliance of the school’s educational program. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
assessment policy is a mandatory accreditation requirement of schools for the Record of School Achievement and the Higher School Certificate. They must be developed and implemented to ensure that: students are informed in writing of the assessment requirements for each course including the number, value, type and timing of tasks; meaningful feedback is provided on student’s performance; issues relating to illness, misadventure, mal-practice, late submission and con-completion of tasks are addressed; students are advised when not meeting assessment requirements; and students are informed of their entitlements relating to reviews and appeals. (BOSTES, NSW, located at www.boardofstudies,nsw.edu.au/hsc_assessment)
Assessment Validation is the quality review of the VET assessment process and involves checking that the assessment tool produces valid, reliable, sufficient, current and authentic evidence to enable reasonable judgements to be made as to whether the requirements of the training package or VET accredited course are met. (Australian Government, Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015, p12)
asset register is a tool to help you keep track of the school’s assets. It records the details of all assets owned by the school (Human Edge, 2016)
ASSISI Framework is A Strategic Systems-based Integrated Sustainability Initiative developed by Catholic Earthcare to assist organisations on the ecological conversion journey. It provides a model and strategic pathway towards greater ecological sustainability. (Catholic Earthcare Australia, 2014, Assisi Overview, located at www.catholicearthcare.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/ASSISI-Overview.pdf)
Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL) provides national leadership for the Australian State and Territory governments in promoting excellence in the profession of teaching and school leadership. AITSL has developed the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers and the Australian Professional Standard for Principals. (AITSL, 2014, located at www.aitsl.edu.au)
Australian Professional Standards for Teachers are a public statement of what constitutes teacher quality. They comprise seven Standards that outline what teachers should know and be able to do. The Standards are interconnected, interdependent and overlapping. The Standards are grouped into three domains of teaching: Professional Knowledge, Professional Practice and Professional Engagement. (NESA Australian Professional Standards for Teachers, 2017)
Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) is the framework for regulated qualifications in the Australian education and training system, as agreed by the Commonwealth, State and Territory Ministerial Council with responsibility for higher education (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015, Appendix 1, p91)
Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA) was established as the National VET Regulator under the National Vocational Education and Training Regulator Act (NVR) 2011 to regulate Registered Training providers according to the Standards for NVR Registered Training Organisations 2015 using a risk assessment approach. (RTO 90487 Handbook, 2015, P15)
Authority to Deliver is a list of vocational qualifications and courses including Industry Curriculum Frameworks (ICFs) and Board Endorsed Courses (BECs) that are authorised by the RTO to be delivered in the school. The Authority to Deliver forms part of a quality assurance process by which the RTO confirms that: the school has the appropriately trained personnel and resources necessary for the delivery and assessment of VET courses and; AQF qualifications appear on the Catholic Education, Diocese of Wollongong Scope of Registration. (RTO 90487 Handbook, 2015, p21)
Best Start Gathering and Using Supplementary Information guide is a guide to support teachers in building a student profile to inform quality learning and teaching programs in literacy and numeracy for students with disability or special need who are withdrawn from or do not respond to some or all of the Best Start Kindergarten Assessment tasks. (DoE, 2017 Best Start Kindergarten Assessment: Gathering and Using Supplementary Information guide, p2)
Best Start Kindergarten Assessment (BSKA) is designed to identify each student’s literacy and numeracy skills and understanding at the beginning of Kindergarten in order to determine starting points for learning in aspects of literacy and numeracy. (DEC, NSW, Curriculum Support located at www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au)
Board Developed Course is a course that is set and externally examined by the BOSTES, NSW. There are a large number of these courses including courses in the area of English, Mathematics, Science, Technology, Creative Arts, personal Development Health and Physical Education (PDHPE), Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE), Languages and Vocational Education and Training (VET). These courses may contribute to the calculation of an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR). (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Board Endorsed Course is a course endorsed by the NSW Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards that count towards the Higher School Certificate and that appear of the student’s Record of Achievement. It does not however count in the calculation of the Australian Tertiary Admission Tank (ATAR). There are two types of Board Endorsed Courses – Content endorsed Courses and School Developed Courses and they may be studied as 1 or 2 units and as Preliminary and/or HSC courses (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Board of Studies Teaching and Educational Standards NSW (BOSTES) is the former NSW educational authority with responsibility for school curriculum, student assessment and teaching and regulatory standards in NSW schools which has now become the NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA). (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Borrower Loan Category is a term used in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area to represent a group of borrowers that have the same borrowing rights (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Call Number is the classification for a learning resource that provides the information about where a resource is located within the designated library area. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Casual Teachers are teachers who are employed to work in schools but who are not in permanent or temporary employment. (CEDoW, 2017, Human Resource Services)
Cataloguing is the process of creating metadata representing the learning resources. Cataloguing includes providing information such as authors, titles and subject terms that describe the learning resources in order to effectively store, locate and retrieve resources. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Catholic Education Diocese of Wollongong (CEDoW) refers to Catholic systemic schooling in the Diocese of Wollongong and includes schools in the Illawarra, Macarthur, Shoalhaven and Southern Highlands. It also includes administrative services and support provided through the Catholic Education Office Marian Centre in Wollongong and the Catholic Education Centre Macarthur in Campbelltown. (CEDoW, 2016, Office of the Director)
Catholic Identity is the visible witness to Catholic life and culture: through regular, conscious and active participation in prayer, liturgy and sacramental life of the Church; the deep commitment to ensuring a climate of hospitality, welcome and inclusion through use of signs, symbols, space and design; opportunities for staff to deepen their knowledge and appreciation of Catholic life and culture; and the articulation of integral place of Catholic schools within the evangelising mission of the Church through the celebration of significant people, events and traditions (CEO, DoW, 2011, How Effective is Our Catholic Education Office?)
Catholic Social Teaching is the Catholic Church's presentation and articulation of its reflection on human beings in society. It touches upon and takes into consideration the various arenas that encompass life in society, including the political, economic, social, and cultural - from the family to international development, how we think of those who are homeless to how we care for the environment, from how we shop and consume to the rights of workers and the dignity of work. It sets about naming the realities confronting persons and societies at a given point in time, highlighting the benefits and dangers those realities present to full human flourishing, and it critiques those realities and developments from the point of view of the values and moral vision of the Catholic faith. It promotes a vision of a just society that is grounded in the Bible and in the wisdom gathered from experience by the Christian community. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director: Strategic Planning and Policy)
Certificate IV Training and Assessment is a national recognition for an entry-level qualification in order to deliver training and assessment in vocational education and training. Achievement of this qualification or an equivalent by trainers and assessors is a requirement of the Australian Qualification Training Framework. (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations. (RTO) 2015)
Challenge Test is a practical task given to a VET learner applying for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) in a VET course in order to demonstrate the skill level or ability for a particular unit of competency. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Circulation is the activities relating to the borrowing and returning of learning resources and equipment within the designated library area. The key point of circulation is the circulation desk. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Circulation desk is a term used in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area to represent the function where resources are loaned, returned and reserved (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
class is a group of students that is allocated to a teacher(s) for the delivery of learning, teaching and assessment experiences for a specified key learning area(s) in Years K-6 or a course(s) in Years 7-12 (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
class procedures are the routines, systems and procedures for each classroom or other learning environment to provide high levels of support for learning, safety and positivity. They should be consistent despite the movement of teachers throughout the school or throughout the week. Procedures may include but not limited to: expectations of learners; classroom routines for movement, seating etc.; reference to school and classroom behaviour management processes; classroom rules, rewards and consequences. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Client is a VET learner, enterprise or organisation that uses or purchases the services provided by an RTO. (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015)
Cohort is the entire group of students in a particular year of schooling who are working through the same aspects of the curriculum towards common outcomes. (CEDoW, 2017 Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Collection is the set of learning resources that are aggregated in the designated library area that are related to each other in some identifiable way for a particular audience or to serve a specific function. The relationship may be by a Call number, subject area or type of object to ensure they are logically grouped together and that they are catalogued for ease of access. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Common Grade Scale is used to report student achievement in Years 1 to 10 in all NSW schools. It describes performance at each of the five grade levels A to E. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Common Grade Scale for Preliminary Courses is used to report student achievement in the Preliminary Stage 6 Year in all NSW schools. It describes performance at each of the five grade levels A to E. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Commonwealth, State and Diocesan improvement initiatives are initiatives that are mandated at Commonwealth, state or diocesan levels to support improved outcomes for students in literacy and numeracy. These initiatives often attract government funding and they are often accompanied by specific strategies and accountabilities. (CEDoW, 2018, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
concepts about print are concepts about how English print works. They include information about where to start reading and how the print travels from left to right across the page. Concepts about print are essential for beginning reading. (NESA, located at www.syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/english/english-k10/glossary)
Consistent Teacher Judgement is the collaborative development of common understandings of syllabus standards and practices. It involved making professional judgements based on clear understandings of the assessment purpose and the consideration of the nature and quality of the work produced. It is important to collaborate with colleagues to evaluate the evidence in order to ensure valid, reliable and comparable judgements about student achievement. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
constrained skills are a set of skills including phonological awareness and phonic knowledge that reach an optimal level early in the development progression and are taught explicitly in the Australian Curriculum. Constrained skills are essential for literacy development but they are not sufficient for a student to become ‘literate’ and that unconstrained skills (such as understanding texts) develop alongside constrained skills. (ACARA, National Literacy and Numeracy Progressions, Literacy Progression, Appendix 1)
Copy Record is a term used interchangeably with ‘copy’ and ‘record’ to refer to the individual copy of a learning resource. A copy record stores information that is specific to one copy in the Library Management System e.g. the barcode, copy number and Resource Loan Category (Oliver, Reference Manual, V5, Build k)
course is the term given to the outcomes and content for a syllabus in the Years 7 -12 NSW curriculum. Key learning areas are divided into subjects that are then divided into courses. E.g. The Key Learning Area of Human Society and its Environment includes the subject of History and the course of Modern History. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Course Performance Descriptors are used to report on a student’s Record of School Achievement (RoSA). They have been developed from the NESA’s general performance descriptors, and provide a more complex description of typical performance in a course at each grade level. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Course Specific Requirements refers to the specific requirements of the syllabus for a particular course. These could include text requirements, student research projects, fieldwork, site studies or time allocated to major aspects of a course (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Credit Transfer is part of the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process that provides credit for a unit of competency that is previously achieved and they are not required to undertake additional units of competency to the VET course requirements. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
cultural competency is the will and actions to build understanding between people, to be respectful and open to different cultural perspectives, strengthen cultural security and work towards equality in opportunity. It is the ability to understand, communicate with and effectively interact with people across cultures. It encompasses: being aware of one’s own worldview; developing positive attitudes towards cultural differences; gaining knowledge of different cultural practices; and developing skills for communication and interaction. (ACECQA, 2016 located at www.acecqa.gov.au)
Culturally Inclusive is the provision of an environment that is characterised by mutual respect, effective relationships, clear communication, explicit understandings about expectations and critical self-reflection and where people of all cultural orientations can freely express their points of view, participate and feel safe. (University of Southern Cross, 2017, located at www.usc.edu.au)
Cumulative Rank is the rank of the student’s achievement within the cohort of the accumulation of marks from HSC assessment tasks. The cumulative rank is recorded after each task throughout the course ensuring that correct weightings have been applied to the tasks prior to reporting. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
curriculum Is the learning and teaching delivered within a school including those that address outcomes of the NESA Syllabuses, the Diocesan Religious Education Curriculum and a range of additional activities in co-curricular areas including sport and pastoral care initiatives. (CEDoW, 2017, School Improvement Services)
Delivery Site is a school that operates under the auspices of the Registered Training Organisation (RTO) to deliver training and assessment of a nationally recognised qualification. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Delivery Site Manager is the principal who is responsible for ensuring that the delivery of training and assessment complies with ASQA standards and the RTO/VET Policy. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
designated library area is the term used by the NSW, Education Standards Authority and is considered to be part of the educational facilities for schools required to deliver the key learning areas or courses of study within a school. It is an area that is generally used to locate, access and store physical and virtual learning resources and equipment. The designated library area can serve a variety of purposes. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication and Learning Technologies)
Dewey Decimal System is used in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area whereby resources are numbered according to a classification system that locates resources to a particular position relative to other resources on the basis of its subject. The Dewey Decimal System allows books to be located on shelves in number order according to the subject. (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
differentiation is a targeted process that involves: forward planning, programming and instruction and the use of teaching, learning and assessment strategies that are fair and flexible; provides an appropriate level of challenge; and engage all students in learning in meaningful ways. It can include providing alternative methods and choices, resources and stimulus materials, flexible learning experiences and providing individualised feedback to students can help identify student strengths and areas for improvement. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Diocesan electronic Student Information System (eSIS) is the term that groups a range of electronic information systems that store student information and are in use in Diocesan systemic schools. Systems classified under the group of ‘eSIS’ include SAS 2000, Sentral, IRIS and Compass. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Diocesan Environmental Education professional learning experiences are mandatory professional learning for School Wollongong Environmental Network (WEN) Contacts. This professional learning is delivered by CEDoW to enhance the understanding of staff and students of the impact of their environmental footprint and to support the implementation of quality environmental education and action initiatives in schools. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Diocesan Kindergarten Report Format is made available to Kindergarten teachers through the Diocesan eSIS during Term 4 each year and is the mandated, system-wide academic report format used to communicate student achievement in Kindergarten to parents/carers. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Diocesan Leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education professional learning is mandatory professional learning for School Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Contacts. This professional learning is delivered by CEDoW to support the implementation of quality Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education initiatives in schools. The professional learning is designed to improve the educational outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and enhance the cultural competency of all staff and students. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Diocesan Learning and Teaching Framework (DLTF) articulates the nature of the learner and learning in the Catholic school and is inclusive of the Quality Teaching dimensions: Intellectual Quality; Quality Learning Environment: and Significance. It provides the basis for professional reflection and conversation about pedagogy and enables learning communities to engage in the process of creating and reflecting on learning and teaching practices. (CEO, DoW, DLTF, 2008, p5)
Diocesan Non-graded Report Format is made available to schools through the Diocesan eSIS during Term 2 for Semester 1 and Term 4 for Semester 2 as a means of communicating student achievement to parents/carers. It is the mandated, system-wide academic report format to be offered as an alternative for students in Years 1 to 6 for whom it is not deemed to be in their best interests to receive a graded report. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Diocesan Religious Literacy Assessment Handbook provides information to schools and teachers about the preparation, administration and completion requirements for the Religious Literacy Assessments Parts A and B. (CEO, DoW, located at www.infopoint.dow.catholic.edu.au)
Diocesan Religious Literacy Assessment Program is an assessment instrument for students in Years 4 and 8 to profile and understand the extent and level of religious literacy where students are enabled to show what they have achieved and to demonstrate their ability to work with and apply what they have learned. (CEO, DoW, located at www.infopoint.dow.catholic.edu.au)
Diocesan Religious Literacy Framework is a framework for assessment in Religious Education in Wollongong, which focuses on students’ knowledge and understanding of key concepts that are addressed by the Religious Education curriculum and their ability to communicate with their religious tradition. The Framework includes: knowing the tradition; working with the tradition; applying the tradition; and valuing the tradition. (CEO, DoW, located at www.infopoint.dow.catholic.edu.au)
Diocesan Stages 1-3 Report Formats are made available to schools through the Diocesan eSIS during Term 2 for Semester 1 and Term 4 for Semester 2 as a means of communicating students achievement to parents/carers. They are the mandated, system-wide academic report formats to be used for students in Years 1 to 6. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Diocesan Whole School Profile of Language Proficiency provides schools with data on the key languages spoken and the English language proficiency of students and their parents/carers. It highlights EAL/D students’ areas of strength and areas needing further development. In addition, it provides the school with detailed information on a number of areas including the: number and percentage of English speaking background students; number and percentage of LBOTE students; number and percentage of EAL/D students; and number and percentage of Beginning English, Emerging English, Developing English and Consolidating English students. (CEDoW, 2018, School Improvement Services)
Disability Provisions are practical arrangements designed to help students who couldn’t otherwise make a fair attempt to show what they know in a HSC exam room. The provisions granted are solely determined by how the student’s exam performance is affected and may include braille papers, large-print papers, use of a reader and/or writer, extra time or rest breaks. Application forms and information guides for disability provisions are available from Schools Online. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Disposal is a term used to identify the status of a learning resource in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area whereby resources are deemed to be inappropriate, superseded, out-dated, unattractive, incomplete or damaged (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
diverse learning needs are the learning needs of students from diverse cultural and economic backgrounds and who have a broad range of learning strengths and challenges. Teachers are obligated to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners in order to facilitate inclusion. Inclusive education is the process of responding to the uniqueness of individuals, increasing their presence, access, participation and achievement in a learning society. (Summit on Inclusive Education, 2002)
early arithmetic skills includes the skills of numeral identification, forward word sequence, backward word sequence, pattern structure and facile strategies that support student progression from counting by ones to a competence of using part-whole knowledge of numbers (CEDoW, 2018, School Improvement Services)
eco-spirituality connects the science of ecology with spirituality. It brings together religion and environmental activism. Eco-spirituality teaches that divine life extends to all reality, and the Cosmos is an integral part of God’s self-revelation. In eco-spirituality we explore our relationship with God in the context of our relationship with the whole Cosmos, with God in the centre as creator of this masterpiece. (Treston, 2010, p147)
eco-theology is a form of constructive theology that focuses on the interrelationships of religion and nature, particularly in the light of environmental concerns. It is a theology of the natural world that explores an integral ecology viewing the whole of creation as one interrelated community involving three aspects: other creatures have meaning and value because God is present to each of them; each creature is a Word of God to human beings; and human beings are part of nature and together with other creatures form a sublime communion in God. (Edwards, 2017, Hope for our Common Home, located at www.catholicearthcare.org.au)
ecological conversion is an expression of the need for people and nations to see more clearly that creation is a precious gift that is to be loved, respected and protected. It is a radical change of mind and heart that leads to a deepening respect for other species and for their habitats and a commitment to their flourishing in an interrelated global community of life. This change of mind and heart leads to a deeper love and respect for all creatures as having their own integrity before God. It involves changing to a sustainable lifestyle, to sustainable patterns of production and consumption, and to sustainable economic and political choices. (CEDoW, 2018, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
ecological learning experiences are immersive and meaningful learning experiences about the natural world and our relationships with it that include practical education for sustainable living and advocacy skills on a range of crucial environmental issues. (Centre for Ecological Learning, 2017, located at www.cel.org.au)
electronic competency register (ECR) is an electronic document created by the RTO in order to document and report VET competency outcomes for Learners. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
English is the mandatory subject from Kindergarten to Year 12 in the NSW curriculum. Knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes acquired in English are central to the learning and development of students. Developing proficiency in English enables students to take their place as confident communicators, critical and imaginative thinkers, lifelong learners and informed, active participants in Australian society. It supports the development and expression of a system of personal values, based on students’ understanding of moral and ethical matters, and gives expression to their hopes and ideals. (NESA, 2013, English K-10 Syllabus, p10)
English as an Additional Language or Dialect (EAL/D) is a term used to describe students whose first language is a language or dialect other than English and who require additional support to assist them to develop proficiency in English. EAL/D students come from diverse, multilingual backgrounds and may include: overseas and Australian-born students whose first language is a language other than English; and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students whose first language is an Indigenous language,
(ACARA, 2012, English as an Additional Language or Dialect Teacher Resource Overview and EAL/D Learning Progression, p3)
Environmental Action Days of Significance are a number of days throughout the year that provide an opportunity to focus on or engage in activities that relate to the care of the environment. These include: World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation (1 September); and World Environment Day (5 June). For other dates please see Green Dates for Schools https://www.dow.catholic.edu.au/catholic-education/wen/. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director: Strategic Planning and Policy)
ethical use of resources is the procurement of and use of resources that take a full and balanced account of the wellbeing of society, including people the earth and future generations. (CEDoW, 2018 Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
evaluation is an essential aspect of professional practice. It must be reflective in nature and used by teachers to inform their professional and pedagogical choices. Evaluation should include: the effectiveness of the units of work in differentiating for all learners; the extent to which the outcomes have been demonstrated and the effectiveness of pedagogical practices employed. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
explicit teaching is an instructional strategy used by teachers to meet the needs of their students and engage them in unambiguous, clearly articulated teaching. Teachers plan for explicit teaching to make clear connections to curriculum content, through a concise focus on the gradual and progressive steps that lead to a student’s development and independent application of knowledge. (Education Services Australia, located at http://www.teachingacenglish.edu.au/explicit-teaching/overview/explict-overview.html)
externally-delivered VET are courses developed or endorsed by NESA, delivered by TAFE or an another external registered provider, which secondary students may study while completed their HSC at school. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Feedback is the provision of information to clarify for students: how their knowledge, understanding and skills are developing in relation to the syllabus outcomes and content being addressed; and how to improve their learning. Feedback should: be timely, specific and related to the learning and assessment intention; be constructive and provide meaningful information to students about their learning in a variety of forms; focus on the activity and correct misunderstandings; identify and reinforce students’ strengths; provide information about how they can improve; facilitate the development of and provide opportunities for self-assessment and reflection during the learning process; and inform future teaching and learning opportunities. Feedback can occur at any point in the teaching, learning and assessment cycle and may take many forms. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
foundation statements are short, clear descriptions of the knowledge and skills that each student should develop at each stage of primary school. They help teachers manage the curriculum more effectively by describing clearly the state-wide common curriculum requirements and prioritising what needs to be taught in all primary schools. They are applicable to Primary syllabuses that were developed prior to NSW Syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Glossary Terms
Grade Distribution list/table are made available to parents/carers on request at the end of each reporting period. They show for each KLA/course in each Year for that reporting period, the number of each grade (As, Bs, Cs, Ds and Es) that were awarded to students. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Higher School Certificate (HSC) is the highest educational award as the credential awarded to secondary school students who successfully complete senior high school level studies (Year 11 and 12 or equivalent) in New South Wales. It is an internationally recognised credential that provides a foundation for students entering tertiary study, vocational training or employment. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au
Industry Currency Skills are the knowledge, skills and experience required by VET trainers and assessors and those who provide training and assessment under supervision to ensure their training and assessment is based on current industry practices and meets the needs of industry. (Australian Government, Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015, p7)
Industry Curriculum Information Guidelines (ICIG) are the guidelines to support the quality delivery of an Industry Curriculum Framework. They include the teacher training requirements, resource/equipment requirements, assessor qualifications, the use of qualified assessors and the quality assurance requirements. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Information Literacy Skills is the set of abilities to recognise when information is needed and to be able to identify, locate, evaluate and effectively use that information. These skills are increasingly important in the contemporary environment of rapid technological change and information resources. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication and Learning Technologies)
Integration is when outcomes and or content from more than one syllabus are being taught in a single unit around a common issue, theme or idea. It is critical that the integrity of each syllabus is maintained when teaching in an integrated approach. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
intervention is the act or instance of proactively providing additional support and/or specialised services to empower, build skills, enhance wellbeing, foster learning and manage the situation. (CEDoW, 2013, MSPEC Policy)
key learning area (KLA) is the subject discipline area. For the primary curriculum there are six KLAs all of which are requirements of the NSW curriculum. For the secondary curriculum there are 8 KLAs that provide the organisational structure for subjects and courses within the NSW curriculum. Subjects are grouped into KLAs for example Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) includes Australian History, Australian Geography, Business Studies, Society and Culture and Legal Studies among its selection of subjects. Due to the particular nature of Catholic schools, Religious Education is considered to be an additional key learning area for the primary and secondary curriculum. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Laudato Si' is the second Encyclical letter of Pope Francis subtitled On Care for Our Common Home. It is an appeal addressed to 'every person living on this planet' for an inclusive dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet. Pope Francis calls the Church and the world to acknowledge the urgency of our environmental challenges and to join him in embarking on a new path. This encyclical is written with both hope and resolve, looking to our common future with candour and humility. The encyclical is developed around the concept of an integral ecology that explains that human life is grounded in three fundamental and closely intertwined relationships: with God, with our neighbour and with the earth itself. (Laudato Si’ A Summary, 2015, www.catholic.org.au/commission-documents/bishops-commission-for-justice-ecology-and-development/laudato-si/1711-encyclical-summary/file)
Leadership Framework identifies current leadership requirements and practices for CEDoW school leaders and provides a structure for the professional growth of existing and aspiring leaders. The framework is based on the AITSL Australian Professional Standard for Principals and includes the additional professional practice of Leading Catholic Life, Education and Mission. (CEDoW, 2015, Human Resource Services)
Learner is a person being trained and/or assessed by the RTO for the purpose of issuing AQF certification documentation (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015, Appendix 1, p94)
Learning Across the Curriculum includes the cross-curriculum priorities, general capabilities and other important learning to assist students to achieve the broad learning outcomes defined by the NSW Education Standards Authority K-10 Curriculum Framework and Statement of Equity Principles, and in the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (December 2008). The cross curriculum priorities are: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures; Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia; and Sustainability. The general capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours to assist students to live and work successfully in the 21st century. They include: Critical and creative thinking; Ethical understanding; Information and communication technology capability; Intercultural understanding; Literacy; Numeracy; Personal and social capability. The syllabuses include other areas identified as important for all students including: Civics and citizenship; Difference and diversity: and Work and enterprise. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Learning and Teaching Cycle consists of assessing, planning, programming, implementing and evaluating. In the context of NESA syllabuses, outcomes are used a key reference points for decisions including: what evidence of learning is required (assessing); how will this evidence be gathered (planning); what content, learning experiences and instruction will allow students to demonstrate these outcomes (programming); how will feedback be provided (implementing); and is there sufficient evidence that students have made progress as a result of these experiences (evaluating). (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
learning and teaching programs are records of planned learning experiences for units of work. A program should: reflect the needs, interests and abilities of students; be based on syllabus outcomes and include a variety of teaching, learning and assessment activities, strategies and resources to address the learning needs of all students; be a flexible and dynamic document that changes in response to student learning needs, school context, teacher evaluation and feedback; include adjustments for students with special education needs; reflect school and sector priorities, values and initiatives; and provide a record of how syllabus requirements are met. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
learning intentions are developed directly from the syllabus outcomes that are clustered together for teaching purposes. They must be written in student-friendly language and be visible in classrooms for students to reference. (Sharratt and Fullan, 2012, Putting Faces on the Data, p209)
Lending Rules is a term used in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area to apply when loaning resources to specify all of the circulation policies (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Life Skills Courses are Stage 6 courses which provide a curriculum option for the small percentage of students with special education needs for whom the regular outcomes and content are not appropriate. These courses have Board Developed status and can be used to meet the requirements for the award of the Higher School Certificate. Specific eligibility rules apply to these courses. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Life Skills outcomes and content are developed from the objectives of the syllabus and indicate the knowledge, understanding and skills expected by most students as a result of effective teaching and learning by the end of a stage delivered through a relevant and meaningful program of study that reflects the needs, interests and abilities of the students. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Lighting the Way through faith and learning Vision and Strategic Direction 2015-2017 is Catholic Education, Diocese of Wollongong’s key strategic planning document that identifies Values, Vision, Context and Targeted Areas for Improvement to support student growth in faith and improvement in learning. The five Targeted Areas for Improvement for 2015-2017 include: Mission; Leadership; Numeracy and Literacy; Early Learning; and Diverse Student Learning Needs. (CEDoW, 2015, Office of the Director)
literacy is the ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate and compute, using printed and written (and visual) materials associated with varying contexts. It involves a continuum of learning to enable an individual to achieve his or her goals, to develop his or her knowledge and potential and to participate fully in the wider society. Being literate means being able to: access, record, develop and communicate ideas; comprehend and build knowledge; respond creatively to produce works of social, cultural, aesthetic, historical and economic importance; pose, explore, and respond to local, national and global issues, problems and challenges; understand and interact with bureaucracies, and maintain personal records and; enjoy spending time with and sharing a wide range of entertaining texts. (ALEA, Literacy in 21st Century Australia: The ALEA Declaration)
Literacy Continuum describes how students progress in literacy across the curriculum. It identifies the behaviours that demonstrate how a student’s skills and understandings develop in eight aspects of literacy that are regarded as critical to individual success. It describes the key markers of student achievement in each aspect. The continuum can be used with other support materials such as the EAL/D Learning Progression and the ESL scales, to help meet the needs of all students. (DEC, 2015, An overview of the Literacy continuum K-10, p1)
local environmental service and advocacy projects are projects that are conducted by service and advocacy groups to support environmental education and action including conservation projects and management of local natural areas to protect the natural environment, reduce the use of natural resources and support quality of life for present and future generations. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Maintenance Cycle is the period through which Teachers must maintain their accreditation level. The cycle is five (5) years for full-time teachers, and seven (7) years for casual or part-time teachers. The first maintenance cycle begins on the day teachers are accredited ta Proficient Teacher, and ends five or seven years later, as relevant. Each new maintenance cycle begins the day after the previous cycle ends. (NESA, 2016, Policy for Maintenance of Accreditation at Proficient Teacher)
Managing Student Pastoral and Educational Concerns (MSPEC) is a Diocesan procedure to support the response and management of concerns pertaining to students that manifest themselves in one or all of the following: behaviours of concern; extreme or persistent problem behaviour; poor or underestimated educational outcomes; identified or emerging special needs; known or suspected pastoral needs; indicators or disclosures of harm, abuse or ill-treatment; indicators of lack of or inappropriate physical, social or psychological development; and risks to self, peers, staff or others. (CEDoW, 2016, www.dow.catholic.edu.au)
Mathematics is the mandatory subject from Kindergarten to Year 10 in the NSW curriculum and optional study in Year 11 and 12. Mathematics in K–10 provides students with knowledge, skills and understanding in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. It focuses on developing increasingly sophisticated and refined mathematical understanding, fluency, communication, logical reasoning, analytical thought and problem-solving skills. These capabilities enable students to respond to familiar and unfamiliar situations by employing strategies to make informed decisions and solve problems relevant to their further education and everyday lives. The ability to make informed decisions and to interpret and apply mathematics in a variety of contexts is an essential component of students’ preparation for life in the 21st century. (NESA, 2013, Mathematics K-10 Syllabus, p10)
missionary and ecclesial refer to terms that separately mean: missionary (relating to or characteristic of a religious mission) and ecclesial (relating to or constituting a Church or denomination). In this context the terms together describe a response to the Gospel call to bring about the “Reign of God” on earth. God’s concern is for the whole of creation and the Church’s work is to safeguard the integrity of all creation. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
multimodal text is the strategic use of ‘two or more communication modes; to make meaning, for example image, gesture, music, spoken language, and written language. While the development of multimodal literacy is strongly associated with the growth of digital communication technologies, multimodal is not synonymous with digital. The choice of media for multimodal text creation is therefore always an important consideration (ACARA, located at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au)
NAPLAN Handbook for Principals is a Handbook to ensure that principals and teachers understand what is required to administer NAPLAN. It is designed for principals who have the ultimate responsibility within their school for ensuring that the tests are appropriately administered and that relevant information is conveyed in a timely manner to all staff members involved in the administration of the test at the school. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
NAPLAN Test Administration Handbook is a Handbook which provides test administrators with all the instructions that are needed to administer NAPLAN tests including specific student instructions and test administration scripts so that all students across Australia receive the same test instructions. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) are the assessments provided to students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 to demonstrate their achievements in numeracy, reading, writing and language conventions (spelling, punctuation and grammar). The assessments are developed by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) and administered by New South Wales Education Standards Authority (NESA). (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
National Sample Assessment Program are assessments that test students’ skills and understanding in science literacy, civics and citizenship and information and communication technology (ICT) literacy. Only selected groups of students in Years 6 and 10 participate in these sample assessments, which are held on a rolling three-yearly basis. (ACARA, located at www.nap.edu.au)
NESA Authorities Online is a service that allows education authorities and systems to view entry and statistical information held by the NESA about schools under their management via secured access to the NESA website. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
NESA Literacy and Numeracy Tests are the optional tests available for students who intend to leave secondary school before completing their HSC. The test reports give an overview of a student’s level of achievement in literacy and numeracy, focusing on the skills required by school-leavers for employment and further education. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
NESA Registered Professional Development (PD) is professional development that can only be provided by NESA endorsed providers. Registered professional development has met all endorsement criteria to support the knowledge, skills and capabilities of teachers and provides an assurance to the teaching profession that their professional development is of a high quality and directly addresses and is mapped to the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. (NESA, www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au)
NESA RTOs Online is a service that allows Registered Training Organisations to view entry and completion information held by the NESA about VET in Schools programs managed by the RTO via secured access to the NESA website. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
NESA Schools Online is a service that allows Principals and selected staff to view and maintain information held by NESA about their school and students via secured access to the NESA website. It can be used to collect, analyse and act on data relevant for continuous improvement of learning, training and assessment. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
NESA Students Online is the source of information for a student/learner about their study from year 10 to the HSC. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
NESA Teacher Accreditation is the system of accreditation for teachers using the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers under the Teacher Accreditation Act 2004. (NESA, located at www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au)
New Arrival students are a diverse cohort of students and can include students from refugee backgrounds, students with limited literacy due to disrupted schooling or they can be migrant students with continuous schooling and advanced language and literacy skills in their first language. (Department of Education and Training NSW, 2014, English as an Additional Language or Dialect - Advice for Schools)
New South Wales Education Standards Authority (NESA) replaced the Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW (BOSTES) on 1 January 2017. NESA is focused on: developing evidence-based policy to improve student achievement and support teachers; and risk-based monitoring o Teacher Accreditation Authorities and schools. NESA set sand monitors quality teaching, learning, assessment and school standards. This includes responsibility, across NSW public, Catholic and independent schools, for: kindergarten to Year 12 curriculum; accreditation of teachers and teaching degrees; the internationally recognised Higher School Certificate; and school registration and home schooling. (NESA, www.educationstandardsauthority.edu.au)
numeracy involves drawing on knowledge of particular contexts and circumstances in deciding when to use mathematics, choosing the mathematics to use, and critically evaluating its use. To be numerate is to use mathematics effectively to meet the general demands of life at home, in work, and for participation in community and civic life. Students become numerate as they develop capacity to recognise and understand the role of mathematics in the work around them and the confidence, willingness and ability to apply mathematics to their lives in constructive and meaningful ways. Highly numerate students interpret, apply and critically evaluate mathematical strategies, and communicate mathematical reasoning in a range of practical situations. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Numeracy Continuum outlines a progression of learning that can be used when observing students working on problems in mathematics. The continuum provides teachers with an explicit framework of student strategies showing increasing levels of sophistication and the interconnected nature of Mathematics knowledge and understanding. It includes seven aspects that should not be regarded as distinct from one another, nor developing in a fixed order. Rather the aspects are overlapping and interrelated. (DoE, located at www.numeracycontinuum.com)
Oliver Library Management System is a web-based, relational database delivered by Softlink for the management of learning resources that are maintained as part of the designated library area. It includes circulation and self-circulation, cataloguing, acquisition, serials, technical manuals, management and system modules to provide users with the tools to successfully manage the operation of any type of library. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication and Learning Technologies)
outcomes are located in NESA syllabuses to identify the sequence of knowledge, skills and understandings that students will be able to demonstrate at each stage from kindergarten to year 12 as a result of the learning, teaching and assessment experiences. Teachers are required to use outcomes for the basis of planning, programming, learning, teaching and assessment. (NESA, 2017, www.syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au)
Overdrive is a service offered by the CEDoW that allows Staff and Students to borrow eBooks and Audiobooks from the digital collection. CEDoW and School staff select the digital content for the Diocesan Overdrive collection. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Parameters is a term used in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area for settings which enable the learning resource manager to customise the learning management system’s functionality to ensure it complies with policy requirements (Information Communication Learning Technologies, CEDoW, 2016)
parents and carers CEDoW uses the term 'parents and carers' inclusive of all adult caregivers who have the responsibility for the care and wellbeing for a child or children. This recognises that the role of parent/carer is played by a range of individuals within the diversity of family structures that exist, and may include those who are in both a biological or non-biological relationship with a child or children.
Path to Life is a framework for Pastoral Care and Wellbeing for Systemic Catholic Schools in the Diocese of Wollongong. It provides 10 pathways for enabling students to contribute in a meaningful way to their school and their local community in order to create a sense of purpose and responsibility for a just and hope-filled global society. (CEO, DoW, Path To Life, p2)
pedagogy is the art and science of teaching and focuses attention in the processes through which knowledge is constructed, produced and critiqued. Classroom practice utilises three dimensions of pedagogy: Intellectual Quality; Quality Learning Environment; and Significance. (DET, 2003, Quality teaching in NSW public schools, p4-5)
Performance and Development Framework is a CEDoW framework to ensure that all staff have access to effective, continuous and constructive feedback throughout their careers in order to support the improvement of practice as a powerful means of improving student learning outcomes. The framework is adapted from the AITSL Performance and Development Framework and describes the characteristics of an effective performance and development cycle including: reflection and goal setting; professional practice and learning; and feedback and review. (CEDoW, 2015, Human Resource Services)
Performance and Development Plan (PDP) is the documented process to set and review goals related to performance, development and growth. The process includes self-reflection on practice informed by evidence and feedback and engagement on professional conversations about practice and performance with a PDP facilitator. (CEDoW, 2015, Performance and Development Framework)
Personalised Learning Plan (PLP) is an active process, developed by teachers, mostly in consultation with students and parents to identify organise and apply personalised approaches to learning. It includes gathering data about the student, their learning, patterns of behaviour and attendance, attitude to school, social skills, family background, and cultural understanding. It also includes the development of specific learning goals and strategies to support students’ learning, pastoral and cultural needs. (DEEWR, Australian Government, 2011, Guide to developing Personalised Learning Plans for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students)
Personalised Learning Plans (PLPs) are a requirement of the Australian Government for each Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student. They are plans that are developed by working with each student, in partnership with students' parents/carers to articulate the students' goals and actions to meet their learning, pastoral and cultural needs. (DEEWR, Australian Government, 2011, Guide to developing Personalised Learning Plans for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students).
Personalised Plan (PP) documents the adjustments and supports that are necessary to facilitate participation in learning and all aspects of school life for a Student with Disability. It is a product of collaborative planning involving the student, parents/carers, relevant health professionals and teachers. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Personalised Plans document the adjustments and supports that are necessary to facilitate participation in learning and all aspects of school life for a Student with Disability. They are a product of collaborative planning involving the student, parents/carers, relevant health professionals and teachers. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
phonemic awareness is an ability to hear, identify and manipulate separate, individual phonemes in words (ACARA, located at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/resources/national-literacy-and-numeracy-learning-progressions)
phonics is the system of relationships between letters and sounds in a language. Phonics teaches the correspondence between the sounds of English (phonemes) and the letter patterns which represent the sounds (graphemes) (ACARA, located at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/resources/national-literacy-and-numeracy-learning-progressions)
Preliminary Year is the pre-requisite year of study and the satisfactory completion of the Preliminary course or its equivalent for entry into an Higher School Certificate (HSC) course. For HSC examination purposes, the Preliminary course is regarded as assumed knowledge that has been studied by all candidates. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Principles of Assessment are used to support quality VET assessment. They include:
Fairness: The individual learner’s needs are considered in the assessment process. Where appropriate, reasonable adjustments are applied by the RTO to take into account the individual learner’s needs. The RTO informs the learner about the assessment process, and provides the learner with the opportunity to challenge the result of the assessment and the reassessed if necessary; Flexibility: Assessment is flexible to the individual learner by: Reflecting the learner’s needs; Assessing the competencies held by the learner no matter how or where they have been acquired; and Drawing from a range of assessment methods and using those that are appropriate to the context, the unit of competency and associated assessment requirements, and the individual. Validity: Any assessment decision of the RTO is justified, cased on the evidence of performance of the individual learner. Validity requires: Assessment against the unit(s) of competency and the associated assessment requirements covers the broad range of skills and knowledge that are essential to competent performance; Assessment of knowledge and skills is integrated with their practical application; Assessment to the based on evidence that demonstrates that a learner could demonstrate these skills and knowledge in other similar situations; and Judgement of competence is based on evidence of learner performance that is aligned to the unit/s of competency and associated assessment requirements. Reliability: Evidence presented for assessment is consistently interpreted and assessment results are comparable irrespective of the assessor conducting the assessment. (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015)
Programming is an important process in the teaching, learning and assessment cycle that enables teachers to plan for the delivery of syllabus content and improve student learning outcomes. Programming is the process of selecting and sequencing learning experiences that cater for the diversity of student learning needs in a particular year and/or stage. The process of programming is typically shared in schools and offers an opportunity for collaboration, professional reflection and evaluation. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Progressive Achievement Tests (PAT) are tests developed by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) which focus on assessing and monitoring student growth over time. This approach to testing is informed by a growth mindset that supports tailored teaching to the needs of individual learners to advance the progress of every student, regardless of the starting point. (ACER, located at https://www.acer.org/pat)
Protocols are appropriate ways of behaving, communicating and showing respect for the diversity o history and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. They involve appreciation of the knowledge, standing and status of people within the local Aboriginal community. Protocols will vary between people and between people within communities. Knowing protocols and ensuring they are observed is critical to successful community consultation and cultural initiatives. (BOS, NSW, 2008, Working with Aboriginal Communities: A Guide to Community Consultation, Revised Edition)
Qualitative Assessment Results include the gathering and analysing of achievement information using a range of methods including observations, interviews, surveys, samples of student work, feedback sheets, evaluations and anecdotal information. (CEDoW, 2017, School Improvement Services)
Quantitative Assessment Results include the gathering and analysing of achievement information using a range of data from standards-referenced assessments including HSC results, NAPLAN results, RoSA grades, A-E grades, and class assessment results. (CEDoW, 2017, School Improvement Services)
Reasonable Adjustment is any measure or action that a student requires because of their disability, and which has the effect of assisting the student to access and participate in education and training on the same basis as students without a disability. An adjustment is reasonable if it achieves this purpose while taking into account facts such as the nature of the student’s disability, the views of the student, the potential effect of the adjustment on the student and others who might be affected, and the costs and benefits of making the adjustment. An education provider is also entitled to maintain the academic integrity of a course or program and to consider the requirements or components that are inherent or essential to its nature when assessing whether an adjustment is reasonable. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is an assessment process that assesses the competencies of an individual that may have been acquired through formal, non-formal and informal learning to determine the extent to which that individual meet the requirements specified in the training package or VET accredited courses. (Australian Government, Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015)
Reconciliation is the building of relationships, respect and trust between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the wider Australian community. Reconciliation is based on five interrelated dimensions: race relations, equality and equity, unity, institutional integrity and historical acceptance. (Reconciliation Australia, 2017, located at www.reconciliation.org,au)
Record of School Achievement (RoSA) is a cumulative credential that allows eligible students who leave school before receiving their Higher School Certificate (HSC) to accumulate academic results until they leave school. It records all courses a student has completed, along with the grade awarded, and any Stage 6 (preliminary) courses in which the student has satisfactorily participated but not completed at the date of leaving school. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
recycling is the collection of a range of products that is then transferred to a recovery facility, sorted and then sent onto various recyclers to be repurposed or remanufactured into a range of new products. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Registered Training Organisation (RTO) is a training provider registered by ASQA to deliver vocational education and training (VET) services. They are recognised as provides of quality-assured and nationally recognised training and qualifications (ASQA, NSW, located at www.asqa.gov.au/about-vet)
Religious Education Coordinator is a significant leadership role in the school with specific responsibility to support the implementation of the mission and vision of the school. The role supports in word and practice the identity of Catholic schools and helps to ensure the school is truly Catholic in every aspect including supporting quality learning and teaching in Religious Education. (CEDoW, 2017, Human Resource Services)
Religious Education Curriculum is the mandated curriculum for the teaching of Religious Education in Diocesan schools. It aims to lay foundations for learning and engaging with the mystery of God and the faith of the Church. The Religious Education Curriculum through the seasons of the Liturgical Year, aims to assist the students to: reflect upon; make sense of; celebrate; and live more deeply; the mystery of Christ as revealed in each person and in relationship with others, the Church, and Creation. (CEDoW, 2006, Diocese of Wollongong Religious Education Curriculum)
reporting is the process of communicating student achievement with parents/carers at nominated points throughout an academic year through the provision of a written academic report. In NSW reporting occurs in a standards-referenced framework where student achievement in each KLA/course is represented by awarding a grade from the Common Grade Scale. Reporting may also include the provision of written comments or other indicators of student achievement and social or academic behaviours (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Resource Loan Category is a term used in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area to determine the lending rules for each copy or resource that is located in the area (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
resources and equipment are the learning resources that are required by teachers and students to enable the outcomes of the syllabuses to be addressed. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-tier approach to the early identification and support for students with learning and behaviour needs. It begins with high quality instruction and universal screening of all children in general educational settings with some learners provided with interventions at increasing levels of intensity to accelerate their rate of learning. (RTI Action Network, located at www.rtinetwork.org)
RTO Course Descriptions are descriptions of VET courses provided by the RTO that include: the units of competency to be delivered (compulsory core, mandatory NESA units and elective units); pathways to industry; examples of related occupations; mandatory NESA course requirements; competency-based assessment; external assessment options; and course costs which are issued without alterations to delivery sites. (CEDoW, located at www.dow.catholic.edu.au)
RTO Manager is the person with specific responsibility for all operations of the RTO including: the preparation and extension of scope documentation; the key point of contact for ASQA and the Catholic Education Commission NSW; and the monitoring of continuous improvement across all Delivery Sites within the RTO. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Rules of Evidence are used to support quality VET assessment. They include:
Validity where the assessor is assured that the learner has the skills, knowledge and attributes as described in the module or unit of competency and associated assessment requirements; Sufficiency where the assessor is assured that the quality, quantity and relevance of the assessment evidence enables a judgement to be made of a learners’ competency; Authenticity where the assessor is assured the evidence presented for assessment it the learner’s own work; and Currency where the assessor is assured that the assessment evidence demonstrates current competency. This requires the assessment evidence to be from the present or the very recent past. (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015)
School Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Contact is a school staff member(s) nominated to support the implementation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education initiatives in the school. Their role includes being a significant point of contact with Catholic Education, Diocese of Wollongong in relation: to the dissemination of key information; providing information to meet accountability requirements; and participating in mandatory professional learning initiatives, in order to improve the educational outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. (CEDoW, 2017, Strategic Planning and Policy)
school educational program is a clear whole-school place of the learning, teaching and assessment that occurs for learners in that context. It serves as a vehicle through which pedagogical beliefs, values, and learning intent of a school are recorded. It should address the developmental needs of learners and assist them to achieve their educational potential and provide the opportunity for teachers to utilise effective pedagogies to meet these needs. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
School Environmental Management Plan (SEMP) is a document that sets out the school community’s intentions in regard to environmental education and environmental management. It represents an agreement to work together across the whole school. (NSW Government, 2017, Sustainable Schools NSW)
School Literacy and Numeracy Assessment Overview is a school wide systematic assessment profile and schedule for each Year/Grade. The profile and schedule includes the type, purpose and timing of each literacy and numeracy assessment and outlines the gathering, analysis and utilisation of evidence to make informed and consistent judgements to improve future student learning. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
School Review and Improvement (SRI) is a Diocesan framework for the ongoing process of each school’s self-evaluation of their performance and growth. It utilises a commonly agreed set of criteria and the process informs action planning at school level to identify areas of strength and those for improvement. (CEO, DoW, 2012, located at www.dow.catholic.edu.au)
School Support Officers (SSOs) support the delivery of quality learning and teaching within a Catholic school context. They can perform a range of duties as directed by the Principal and the school leadership team either in providing school operational services, school administrative services or classroom and learning support services. (CEDoW, 2017, Human Resource Services)
School-Based Apprenticeship and Traineeship (SBAT) is a career option or pathway, allowing students to commence an apprenticeship or complete a traineeship for a vocational qualification and earn a wage while completing their Higher School Certificate. They equip young people with the employability skills and a national recognised qualification. (NSW Government, located at www.training.nsw.gov.au)

Schools Catalogue Information Service (SCIS) provides schools with access to a database of consistent catalogue records created according to agreed national standards, in order to reduce cost and duplication of effort in cataloguing learning resources in schools. (CEDoW, 2017, Information Communication and Learning Technologies)
scope and sequence summarises what is to be taught and the sequence in which it will be taught. It documents the order of the units within a year or stage, and the syllabus outcomes that each unit addresses. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
scope and sequences summarise what is to be taught and the sequence in which it will be taught. They document the order of the units within a year or stage, and the syllabus outcomes that each unit addresses. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Scope of Registration is the list of the training products for which an RTO is registered to issue AQF certification documentation. It allows the RTO to: both provide training delivery and assessment resulting in the issuance of AQF certification documentation by the RTO or; provide assessment resulting in the issuance of AQF certification documentation by the RTO. (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015)
Smoking Ceremony is one of the most significant ancient ceremonies performed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The ceremony involves smouldering various native plants to produce smoke which is believed to have cleansing properties and the ability to ward off bad spirits.
Spine Labels are labels displaying the call number that are placed on the spine of a resource (usually text) to help identify, store and locate the resource in the designated library area. (CEDoW, 2017, Information, Communication and Learning Technologies)
Staff includes a range of personnel within the school including Principal and members of the leadership team, teaching staff and support staff. (CEDoW, 2017, Human Resource Services)
stage is a term used in NSW syllabuses to describe the learning that is generally covered over two years, with Early Stage 1 representing Kindergarten, Stage 1 representing Years 1 and 2, Stage 2 representing Years 3 and 4, Stage 3 representing Years 5 and 6, Stage 4 representing Years 7 and 8, Stage 5 representing Years 9 and 10, and Stage 6 representing Years 11 and 12. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
Stage Statements are found in NESA syllabuses and are summaries of the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes that have been developed by students as a result of achieving the outcomes for each stage of learning. For the Primary curriculum, Stage Statements are only found in NESA Syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015 are enabled by the National Vocational Education and Training Regulator Act 2011 (NVR ACT), which aim to: provide national consistency in regulation of the VET sector, using a standards-based quality framework and a risk-based approach; promote quality, flexibility and innovation in VET; promote Australia’s reputation for VET locally and overseas; promote a VET system that meets Australia’s social and economic needs; protect students undertaking or proposing to undertake VET in Australia, and; ensure access to accurate information regarding the quality of VET. (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015)
Standards-referenced is the process of collecting and interpreting information about students' learning, using outcomes as key reference points for decisions about their progress and achievement. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
stewardship is a gospel value that requires the responsible planning and management of resources which can be applied to the environment and nature, economics, health, property and information. In relation to the environment it requires honouring the created universe as a gift from the Creator given in trust for all. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Stocktaking is a term used in relation to the management of learning resources in a designated library area for a process to track copies held in the area. It is the process of taking inventory in the library management system (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Student with Disability (SWD) is a student who meets the broad definition of disability described in the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and may require reasonable adjustments according to the Disability Standards for Education 2005 to ensure they are provided with opportunities to participate in education and training ‘on the same basis’ as students without disability. (ACARA, Australian Curriculum, located at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au)
success criteria is criteria that is directly related to the learning intentions that are developed from syllabus outcomes. They should be visible and available in classrooms so that students can use them as a reference while they are doing their work and against which they can measure progress towards their own goals for improvement. They should be co-constructed by teachers and students. (Sharratt and Fullan, 2012, Putting Faces on the Data, p211)
Sustainability involves processes and practices that contribute to more sustainable patterns of living and enables individuals and communities to reflect on ways of interpreting and engaging with the world. In relation to the environment it is future-oriented, focusing on protecting environments and creating a more ecologically and socially just world through informed action. (ACARA, 2017, located at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au)
syllabus is the agreed curriculum content to be covered in a particular KLA or course, designed to be taught within indicative time requirements. They identify the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes students are expected to develop at each stage of learning. (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
Teacher in a Catholic school is qualified educator who delivers learning and teaching to students. The Teacher Is involved in the mission and life of the Catholic Church; is a competent professional according to the Australian Professional Standard for Teachers; and is a professional with statutory duties as well as employee with common law duties to their employer. (CEDoW, 2017, Human Resource Services)
Teacher Accreditation is the process through which a Teacher demonstrates that they have met the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers at one of the career stages of Graduate, Proficient Teacher, Highly Accomplished Teacher or Leader Teacher. (NESA, 2017, Guidelines for the Regulation of Teacher Accreditation Authorities for Non-government Schools and Early Childhood Education Centres)
Teacher Accreditation Assessment Stage is a key stage in the Teacher Accreditation at Proficient Teacher process that occurs after a minimum of 160 days of teaching. The Teacher is required to demonstrate achievement of all Proficient Teacher Standard Descriptors, select relevant evidence, map evidence across the 7 standards, annotate evidence and present annotated evidence to their Teacher Accreditation Supervisor. (CEDoW, 2017, Teacher Accreditation, Overview of Key Stages of Accreditation and Maintenance at Proficient Teacher)
Teacher Accreditation Authority (TAA) is the authority that accredits teachers at Proficient Teacher level. In the Diocese the TAA is the Director of Schools, however a nominated individual is delegated the responsibility to make Proficient Teacher accreditation decisions. The signed and submitted accreditation report along with the selected and annotated evidence is sent to the relevant (assigned) TAA to make an accreditation decision. (NESA, 2017, located at www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au)
Teacher Accreditation Commencement Stage is a key stage in the Teacher Accreditation at Proficient Teacher process that occurs in the first 18 months of appointment. The Teacher is required to develop their teaching practice aligned to the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST), engage in the Diocesan Performance and Development Process (PDP), engage in mentoring process and initiate he Teacher Accreditation Process by registering through CEDoW Employee Self Service. (CEDoW, 2017, Teacher Accreditation, Overview of Key Stages of Accreditation and Maintenance at Proficient Teacher)
Teacher Accreditation Decision Making and Reporting Stage is a key stage in the Teacher Accreditation at Proficient Teacher process that occurs no later than 3 months before the end of the first 3 years of full time teaching (5 years of part time teaching). The Teacher is required to ensure all documentation (annotated evidence and report) is submitted to the TAA for Accreditation decision and respond to any recommendations for resubmission if required. (CEDoW, 2017, Teacher Accreditation, Overview of Key Stages of Accreditation and Maintenance at Proficient Teacher)
Teacher Accreditation Demonstration Stage is a key stage in the Teacher Accreditation at Proficient Teacher process that occurs in the first 3 years of full time teaching (5 years of part time teaching). The Teacher is required to demonstrate, teaching practice aligned to the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST), participate in targeted observation of their practice, engage in the Diocesan Performance and Development Process (PDP), engage in mentoring process, evaluate their progress, and collect evidence against the Standard descriptors (CEDoW, 2017, Teacher Accreditation, Overview of Key Stages of Accreditation and Maintenance at Proficient Teacher)
Teacher Accreditation End Date is the date by which a teacher must meet all accreditation requirements according to the CEDoW Overview of Key Stages of Accreditation and Maintenance at Proficient Teacher. Teachers can ascertain their end date from NESA. (CEDoW, 2017, Human Resource Services)
Teacher Accreditation Orientation Stage is a key stage in the Teacher Accreditation at Proficient Teacher process that occurs within the first 3 months of the Commencement Stage. The Teacher is required to engage in the Diocesan Accreditation Online Orientation Program to ensure they are aware of their responsibilities for gaining accreditation at Proficient Teacher. (CEDoW, 2017, Teacher Accreditation, Overview of Key Stages of Accreditation and Maintenance at Proficient Teacher)
Teacher Accreditation Supervisor is a supervising teacher delegated by the Principal to support teachers through their mandatory Proficient Teacher accreditation process. Supervising teachers are members of the school leadership team with the capacity to supervise and provide feedback to the teacher on practice against the Proficient Teacher Standard Descriptors. Their focus is on supporting the development of teaching skills and knowledge through: discussing the Standards and Standard Descriptors; monitoring progress in consistently demonstrating all the Standard Descriptors at Proficient teacher level; suggesting strategies if needed on teaching practice; making judgements; verifying teaching practice and signing off on supporting documentary evidence; observing teaching practice; giving feedback; and writing the accreditation report. (NESA, located at www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au)
Teacher Identified Professional Development (PD) supports teachers’ professional learning needs and addresses the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers at the relevant career stage. Teacher identified activities align with an individual teacher’s professional learning plan or professional goals and the level of accreditation of the accredited teacher. The activities should have a developmental focus. The professional development is determined by the accredited teacher in negotiation with the School Principal or PD Delegate. The activities incorporate both formal and informal activities that foster professional learning (as opposed to tasks that form part of a teacher’s work).(NESA, 2015, Policy on the Endorsement of Professional Development Providers and Courses)
Traditional Land is the territory of a specific Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander group or clan that is the core of their spirituality and their relationships with others and is fundamental to their wellbeing. The land is typically defined by geographic boundaries such as rivers, lakes, mountains and coastlines. (Australian Government, Australian Indigenous Cultural Heritage, 2017, located at www.australia.gov.au)
Trainer is a person who has the vocational competencies, current industry skills and current knowledge and skills in the training and assessment being provided in accordance with Standard 1 Clause 1.13, 1.14 and 1.16 (ASQA, Users’ Guide to the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTO) 2015)
Training and Assessment Strategy (TAS) is the approach of, and method adopted by, an RTO with respect to training and assessment designed to enable learners to meet requirements of the training package or accredited course. (Australian Government, Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015)
training package includes the components endorsed by the Industry and Skills Council or its delegate in accordance with the Standards for Training Packages. The endorsed components include the units of competency; assessment requirements (associated with each unit of competency); qualifications; and credit arrangements. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Unique Student Identifier (USI) is a reference number made up of 20 numbers and letters that creates a secure online record of a learner’s/client’s recognised training and qualifications gained in Australia even from different training organisations giving them access to their training records and transcripts, online, anywhere for life. (Australian Government, Unique Students Identifier, located at www.usi.gov.au/about)
unit of work is planned and delivered by a teacher(s) to present the syllabus content and the learning, teaching and assessment experiences. They provide the explicit syllabus outcomes and content being addressed; and the experiences that are tailored to the students’ needs, interests and abilities (NESA, located at www.educationstandards.nsw.edu.au)
units of competency are developed by industry to meet the identified skill needs of industry. Each unit of competency identifies a discrete workplace requirement and includes the knowledge and skills that underpin competency as well as language, literacy and numeracy and occupational health and safety requirements. (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
Visual Symbols include a range of items that indicate symbols of welcome and cultural inclusion. They provide the signal for Aboriginal families and communities that place is acknowledging and respectful of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the first peoples of the land. These symbols could include but are not limited to: Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander flags; and items of Aboriginal significance including, artworks, murals, artefacts and acknowledgements. (CEDoW, 2017, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Vocational Education and Training (VET) is the education, training and assessment that is designed to deliver workplace-specific skills and knowledge. (Australian Government, located at www.australia.gov.au)
Vocational Education and Training report is the school report for an individual learner that is generated from the Electronic Competency Register (ECR). (CEDoW, 2015, School Improvement Services)
waste management is the process of sustainable practices to manage waste materials. It involves a hierarchy of actions that includes: avoiding or reducing the creation of waste materials and limiting the amount of waste to be handled; reusing products or materials without the need for re-manufacturing; recycling the value of the discarded materials and transforming them to manufacture new products; and recovering energy recycling that is uneconomic or technically not feasible and where the environment can be protected. (Wollongong City Council, 2014, located at www.)
Weeding is a term used in the management of learning resources that are maintained in the designated library area to refer to the process of archiving a resource or copy record. It is the removing of materials from a collection in a systematic and deliberate way as an ongoing part of the collection development. (CEDoW, 2016, Information Communication Learning Technologies)
Welcome to Country is one of two ways to recognise the Aboriginal people as traditional custodians of the land as an important part of showing respect for the Aboriginal peoples of mainland Australia. It must occur when traditional custodians are available, giving them the opportunity to formally welcome people to their land from other parts of the country or other countries. It is usually conducted as a ceremony or as an oral welcome from the custodial representative. (CEDoW, 2017, Strategic Planning and Policy)
Wollongong Environment Network (WEN) is an initiative of the CEDoW that aims to support school communities respond to Laudato Si’ and implement environmental stewardship and sustainability. The WEN is a strategic attempt to help schools address the educational challenge put forth from Pope Francis in Laudato Si’, and is a response to our call as Christians to “realise that responsibility within creation and our duty towards nature and the Creator, are an essential part of our faith.” Pope John Paul II, 1990 New Year Message (CEDoW, 2017, located at www.dow.catholic.edu.au/catholic-education/laudato-si/)
Wollongong Environment Network (WEN) Contact is a school nominated person who participates in mandatory Diocesan Environmental Education professional learning experiences and who supports the implementation of environmental education and action initiatives in schools. (CEDoW, 2017, Office of the Director, Strategic Planning and Policy)
work experience is a planned opportunity to provide students with the general introduction to the ‘world of work’ to support course preferences, career planning and transition activities. Students are able to observe a variety of work, usually in a field of their choice, and undertake supervised tasks appropriate to their skill level. (CEDoW, 2015, Work Experience Guide)
Working mathematically are outcomes of the Mathematics K-12 syllabus that helps to develop understanding and fluency in mathematics through inquiry, exploring and connecting mathematical concepts, choosing and applying problem-solving skills and mathematical techniques, communication and reasoning (NESA, 2013, Mathematics K-10 Syllabus, p14)
Working With Children Check is a requirement for people who work or volunteer in child-related work. It involves a national criminal history check and a review of findings of workplace misconduct. The result of a Working With Children Check is either a clearance to work with children for five years, or a bar against working with children. Cleared applicants are subject to ongoing monitoring and relevant new records may lead to the clearance being revoked. The Working With Children Check is fully portable so it can be used for any paid or unpaid child-related work in NSW for as long as the worker remains cleared. The Working With Children Check is only one part of keeping children safe. The Working with Children Check is a requirement of Teacher accreditation. (NSW Gov. located at www.kidsguardian.nsw.gov.au)
workplacement is a planned opportunity in a quality host workplace that enables learners studying particular industry-based courses to practice and develop their industry competencies and their employability skills in a vibrant real work context. It is a mandatory component of industry-based vocational education and training (VET) courses that students can choose as part of their studies for the NSW Higher School Certificate. (NSW Government, Education Public Schools, located at www.workplacement.nsw.edu.au)
World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation is an annual Day of Prayer (1 September) that was first declared by the Patriarch of Constantinople in 1989. Following the release of Laudato Si’ in 2015, Pope Francis called on the Catholic Community to join in with the global community in marking 1st September as the World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation. The day of prayer encourages the Catholic community around the world to pray for our common home inviting all to “reaffirm their personal vocation to be stewards of creation, to thank God for the wonderful handiwork which has been entrusted to our care and to implore for God’s help for the protection of creation as well as pardon for the sins committed against the world in which we live”. (Pope Francis, 2015, Letter of His Holiness Pope Francis for the Establishment of the “World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation”)
year is the term used to describe the school year for a cohort of students as part of NSW Registration and Accreditation requirements. Students are enrolled in years from Kindergarten to Year 12. (CEDoW, 2016, School Improvement Services)
‘N’ determination is the decision made by the principal at the end of the course if a student who has not complied with the course completion criteria and who has received at least two written warnings for not having completed the course at the time of finalising grades. Principals must apply for an ‘N’ determination. (NESA, located at www.ace.bostes.nsw.edu.au)